Haluski

Haluski

An Eastern European food typically attributed to Polish origin. It can be a vegetarian dish by not using pork, and is mostly omitted anyways. I added it for more filling. This takes about 10 minutes from starting your prep to finish. Cheap, delicious, and easy.

  • Butter
  • Onion
  • Cabbage
  • Egg noodles
  • (Optional) – pork: bacon, pancetta, kielbasa
  1. Heat a pot of water and a pan with some butter and pork if using.
  2. Chop the onion then put in pan of butter and sauté for a couple minutes
  3. Add egg noodles to water then chop your cabbage
  4. Add your cabbage and some salt and pepper to pan of onions and cook until soft
  5. Add drained egg noodles.
  6. Done

Himmel und Erde

Himmel und Erde

“Heaven and earth”. Mashed potatoes and apples.

  1. Peel an equal amount of apples and potatoes, then large dice the potatoes and large slice the apples.
  2. Boil gently until both are tender in salted water.
  3. Drain, mash together, then add butter, salt, pepper, and nutmeg.

Forelle Müllerin

Forelle Müllerin
  • A classic trout dish, known as trout meunière.
    1. Put salt, pepper, and lemon juice on a piece of trout filet with the skin on. Let sit for a few minutes.
      Dredge in flour and pan fry.
      While frying, melt butter in another pan and brown to drizzle on top of the trout.
      Serve with lemon and any side you want.

    Fredericksburg Home Kitchen Cook Book

    Fredericksburg Home Kitchen Cook Book

    This is a neat book with recipes from 12 other editions with the first one being from 1916 and having 500 copies. Each recipe is submitted with their name and the year it was submitted. The 13th edition was released in 1996.

    There is a decent amount of German food recipes, and the rest is good home cooking. Every recipe is simple and no one is trying to overcomplicate everything.

    I got my copy at the Pioneer Museum in Fredericksburg, though next year is the 175th anniversary so I’m sure there will be something special for that momentous occasion.

    Rosolje

    Rosolje

    Rosolje is an Estonian beet potato salad, with a “kaste” (sauce)

    Diced Salad

    • Beets
    • Potatoes
    • Carrots
    • Pickles
    • Red or White Onion
    • Green Apple
    • Herring Fillets

    Kaste

    • Mayonnaise
    • Plain full fat yogurt or sour cream
    • Vinegar
    • Mustard (preferably hot)
    • Horseradish
    • S&P

    Beet Salad

    1. Equal parts potato and beets, then whatever you want to add

    Kaste

    1. Equal parts mayonnaise and sour cream or yogurt, then the rest to taste

    —Serve with boiled eggs and chives or parsley

    Hakklihakaste

    Hakklihakaste

    An Estonian simple meat sauce. “Kaste” in Estonian is a thinner sauce than a thickened cream sauce. Serve with potatoes, rice, barley, or other choice

    • Ground beef or pork
    • Onion and garlic, minced
    • Cream or whole mile
    • Sour Cream
    • Dill, thyme, chives (your choice)
    1. Render ground beef in butter or oil and then add onion, cook to soft
    2. Add cream or whole milk and let thicken a little
    3. Stir in sour cream and herbs if using

    Schnitzel

    Schnitzel

    Schnitzel is a general term to refer to tenderized pieces of meats that are pan fried. Schnitzel is used in German-speaking countries. The term “Wiener schnitzel” is strictly used for cuts of veal. Kotlets in Polish cuisine are very similarly to Schnitzel.

    The Schnitzel can be breaded, or unbreaded. The main thing is to be fried in fat or oil.

    • Meat of choice – preferably pork chops, beef or veal cutlet
    • Salt & Pepper
    • Flour
    • Eggs
    • Breadcrumbs
      Cut the pork chops in half if using, and tenderize the meat
      Salt and pepper the meat
      Get a pan with about 1/2 inch of lard, clarified butter, or cooking oil hot
      Get 3 plates with: flour, eggs, and breadcrumbs in each one
      Bread the meat, then fry
      Serve with your favorite sauce, potato salad, Rotkohl, or anything of your choosing.

    Gnocchi

    Gnocchi

    Gnocchi is a very simple potato pasta.

    • Potatoes – 2lbs, peeled
    • Flour 3/4-1 cup if baking potatoes, 1 1/2-1 3/4 if boiling potatoes
    • 1 egg
      Peel potatoes and slice into big chucks and boil gently until mashable, or bake on 350 until mushable.
      If you have a ricer, that is great; if not, mash your potatoes as finely as possible, then add the egg and some salt
      Add flour
      Knead until combined, but do not overmix, adding any flour as needed. As always, start with less and work your way up.
      Get a salted pot of water gently boiling
      Grab a small handful of dough while keeping the rest covered with a wet towel, and roll out the dough into 1″ cylinders. I use non-stick spray when rolling, but you can use flour.
      Use a pastry cutter to cut them into bite-sized pieces and roll smooth; it is optional to roll with a fork to create indentions, or you can even buy a gnocchi board for about $10.
      Boil for about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes. Once they all float, I give it 20 seconds. I like mine al dente though you can cook it farther depending on preference. Scoop and drain them, and set on parchment paper.
      Sautée in butter or lard and use whatever sauce you choose

    Arancini

    Arancini

    More information about Arancini and possible variations is under recipe as always.

    Classic Sicilian Arancini – Steps: Risotto, Meat Sauce, and Breading

    Arancini is stuffed risotto, classically with a ragù sauce, then battered and deep or pan fried.

    Risotto – make sure is it thick and the liquid is absorbed properly for shaping https://food-heritage-archives.com/2020/08/10/risotto/

    Meat Sauce

    • Onion sautéed in oil
    • Ground Meat – your choice
    • Tomato Sauce and Paste
    • Peas
    • White or Red Wine
    1. Sautée onions in oil then brown the meat
    2. Deglaze with wine, then add peas, sauce, and paste to finish cooking meat
    3. You want the sauce to be the same consistency or thicker as the photo below as you will need to stuff the rice with this. If you think it is too thin, run the sauce through a sieve and add more tomato paste
    4. Put on a sheet pan to cool quicker

    Breading – dip in flour, eggs, and breadcrumbs of choice.

    1. Put your risotto into one hand, flatten, and then add a heap of sauce. Cup hand to help shape into a ball, adding more risotto if needed to fill gaps. The size of a small lemon is perfect.
    2. Bread the arancini then let set in fridge for a good 1/2 hour at least. They are great to make ahead of time and then fry when you’re ready.

    Frying

    • You oil should be in the the range of 350F if deep frying, but pan fry like any other food, rotating it as needed

    Serving – It goes great with tomato sauce and some arugula. You can top with crispy bacon and mozzarella or try multiple cheeses to find your favorite.

    More About Arancini, and variations

    Arancini has been around for at least 1,000 years, so there have been many variations throughout the years, a very classic Italian way is this Sicilian style. Although most arancini you find in recipes or restaurants is strictly cheese-based, it traditionally has meat, and cheese is optional.

    Good variations to do will be to actually add cheeses inside, such as half a small marinated mozzarella ball, or fontina.

    A good option for the meat is pancetta or pork jowl, or, chicharrones or cracklings.