Apfelkuchen

Apfelkuchen

Apfelkuchen is a German apple cake. This particular one was in “Fredericksburg Home Kitchen Cook Book (13th edition, 150th anniversary of Fredericksburg)”, with Mrs. Henry J. Bierschwale submitring this recipe in 1975.

  • 3 green apples
  • 1/2 cup hot water
  • 3/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • (Optional pecans)
  1. Mix dry ingredients in small bowl
  2. In large bowl add hot water to apples, then oil, then eggs, then flour mixture, and pecans if using
  3. Put in greased baking dish on 325F for 1 1/4 hours

Rödkål

Rödkål

A Swedish way of cooking red cabbage. It is very similar to the German Rotkohl, except I found there are less recipes with green apple. I originally found Rödkål in “Swedish Touches”, and then looked for recipes in Swedish.

  1. Sautée shredded cabbage in butter or lard
  2. Add water and salt, then cover. Simmer until halfway done
  3. Add cloves, apple cider vinegar, and sugar. Finish cooking

Rosolje

Rosolje

Rosolje is an Estonian beet potato salad, with a “kaste” (sauce)

Diced Salad

  • Beets
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Pickles
  • Red or White Onion
  • Green Apple
  • Herring Fillets

Kaste

  • Mayonnaise
  • Plain full fat yogurt or sour cream
  • Vinegar
  • Mustard (preferably hot)
  • Horseradish
  • S&P

Beet Salad

  1. Equal parts potato and beets, then whatever you want to add

Kaste

  1. Equal parts mayonnaise and sour cream or yogurt, then the rest to taste

—Serve with boiled eggs and chives or parsley

Hakklihakaste

Hakklihakaste

An Estonian simple meat sauce. “Kaste” in Estonian is a thinner sauce than a thickened cream sauce. Serve with potatoes, rice, barley, or other choice

  • Ground beef or pork
  • Onion and garlic, minced
  • Cream or whole mile
  • Sour Cream
  • Dill, thyme, chives (your choice)
  1. Render ground beef in butter or oil and then add onion, cook to soft
  2. Add cream or whole milk and let thicken a little
  3. Stir in sour cream and herbs if using

Sinappi

Sinappi

A Finish mustard, originally found in “The Finnish Cookbook” by Beatrice A. Ojakangas. It will be runny, and strong!

  • 4T mustard powder
  • 2t sugar
  • 1/2t salt
  • 4T boiling water and 1T vinegar
  1. Mix dry ingredients and wet separate.
  2. Add wet to dry and incorporate gently until dissolved

Lihapyöryköitä

Lihapyöryköitä

Finnish meatballs, the main difference between American meatballs is added nutmeg and the gravy made from the meat. The original recipe found in “The Finnish Cookbook” by Beatrice A. Ojakangas, and I confirmed it with a website in Finnish

  • Ground beef – 1lb
  • 2/3 cup breadcrumbs soaked in 1/2 cup cream
  • 1 onion, minced
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1/4 tsp allspice, and salt to taste
  • Roux – 2T flour
  • 2 cups milk
  1. Mix beef, breadcrumbs, onion, egg, allspice and salt
  2. Shape into smallish meatballs and brown in butter in pot, then remove
  3. Add 1 more T of butter if necessary for the roux, then add flour. Cook for 1 minute
  4. Add milk and turn into gravy by thickening slightly (it will thicken more with cooking
  5. Return meatballs into pot and simmer for 15 minutes with lid on until sauce is your preference and meat is finished cooking

Stuvad Potatis

Stuvad Potatis

A Swedish dish – potatoes and a cream sauce with dill. Originally found in “Swedish Touches” by David Wright and Martha Wiberg Thompson, and recipe confirmed by a website in Swedish; I adjusted the flour and butter to equal parts.

  • Potatoes – new or Yukon Gold
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1 1/2 cup cream
  • Dill, fresh or dried
  1. Boil new potatoes or Yukon Golds cut in half, set aside
  2. Make a roux with equal flour and butter, 1/4 cup each.
  3. Cook the roux for at least 1 minute to get out flour taste. Then add the cream and cook until thickened to a gravy consistency
  4. Add dill and incorporate, then pour over potatoes

Lescó

Lescó

Lescó is a Hungarian stew. The main ingredients are:

  • Bacon (smoked preferable)
  • Sausage (kielbasa or other high quality)
  • Tomatoes (beefsteak, heirloom, or similar)
  • Hot pepper (Hungarian wax pepper preferably, banana pepper if you cannot find wax pepper)
  • Onion, white, or yellow
  • S&P
  1. Render cubed bacon in a stew pot on medium heat. Add sliced sausage if using raw, or wait until you add tomatoes if smoked
  2. Chop onion then add to pot, let soften a little
  3. Slice peppers, then add, cook while you slice tomatoes
  4. Add tomatoes and smoked sausage if using
  5. Cook until tomatoes are stewed and season with S&P

If you have any memories about a variation in your Hungarian Lescó please let me know. I found ingredients to be the same from “Hungary Today”, and multiple websites in Hungarian.

Más: Tapas Y Vino – Albuquerque, NM

Hilton’s have some of the best cuisine, and this was no exception. It is a Spanish (Spain, not central american) style restaurant in Albuquerque New Mexico. The restaurant itself has a gorgeous balcony and outside patio, located in a historic hotel; built in 1939, it was Conrad Hilton’s first hotel outside of Texas.

The interior of the hotel when you walk in is worthy of Hilton’s Curio Luxury Collection, and to make it even more interesting, it is part of the U.S National Register of Historic Places. I did not personally stay at the hotel, but it is definitely a sight to see.

The food- The portions were generous and delicious. I tried to fill up on carbs before hiking La Luz Trail the next day, and just drank water and very refreshing Sparkling Water.

Meal

Patatas Bravas – “Crunchy potato, spicy aioli, garlic, little herbs” too spicy for my taste, but they made great leftovers the next morning

Green Chile Corn Risotto – “Tomato basil beurre blanc” outstanding. Risotto was cooked perfectly and definitely has a Spanish flair to it.

Vegetable Paella – “Tempura broccoli, artichokes, kale, mushrooms, roasted pepper, saffron calasparra rice”. First paella for me, and I definitely enjoyed it. Vegetables were seasoned well and like the others, the portions were generous.

New Mexico

New Mexico and West Texas were surprisingly mountainous, as this was the first time I have been out there. Great place to drive and get away, and the hiking is something you can’t find in Central Texas.

If I had to pick a trail to hike in New Mexico, it would most likely not be La Luz as there is a boulder path towards the top that is not fun on the way up or down, and the scene from the top was lackluster. I would however take the couple hour journey and go to the Guadalupe Peak (which I did) in Texas. Far better trail and better views.

Of course, there are plenty of trails in the Santa Fe/Albuquerque area that are week-long trip worthy, and I plan to return in the future.