Fredericksburg Home Kitchen Cook Book

Fredericksburg Home Kitchen Cook Book

This is a neat book with recipes from 12 other editions with the first one being from 1916 and having 500 copies. Each recipe is submitted with their name and the year it was submitted. The 13th edition was released in 1996.

There is a decent amount of German food recipes, and the rest is good home cooking. Every recipe is simple and no one is trying to overcomplicate everything.

I got my copy at the Pioneer Museum in Fredericksburg, though next year is the 175th anniversary so I’m sure there will be something special for that momentous occasion.

Rosolje

Rosolje

Rosolje is an Estonian beet potato salad, with a “kaste” (sauce)

Diced Salad

  • Beets
  • Potatoes
  • Carrots
  • Pickles
  • Red or White Onion
  • Green Apple
  • Herring Fillets

Kaste

  • Mayonnaise
  • Plain full fat yogurt or sour cream
  • Vinegar
  • Mustard (preferably hot)
  • Horseradish
  • S&P

Beet Salad

  1. Equal parts potato and beets, then whatever you want to add

Kaste

  1. Equal parts mayonnaise and sour cream or yogurt, then the rest to taste

—Serve with boiled eggs and chives or parsley

Pizza

Pizza

Lengthy description under recipe

Makes 2 large pizzas

  • 1 slightly heaping scoops of 1 1/2 cups of bread flour
  • 1 tsp instant yeast
  • Salt
  • 3/4 cup very warm water
  • 1 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • Olive oil for bowl
    Mix flour, yeast, sugar, and salt. Add water, mix, then add oil.
    Knead for about 30 seconds then oil a large boil. Cover with paper towels
    Let rest for at least 10 minutes and preheat oven to at least 450 with a pizza stone (more info below recipe)
    Spray counter with non-stick spray or use flour, then roll out dough
    Cook until your liking

I have a post in the how-to section just about my adoration for pizza stones.

Pizza is used throughout the world including Flammkuchen and flatbreads.

Italy has created very strict rules on certain types of pizza, including Pizza Napoletana (Neapolitan), and you can check out the official rules here: https://www.pizzanapoletana.org/public/pdf/disciplinare%202008%20UK.pdf

Pizza variations are endless, and you could probably cook a different pizza for every week of your life by browsing all the variations throughout the world. My favorite ways to make pizza are:

BBQ Sauce: Brisket, mozzarella, onions

Horseradish Sauce: mozzarella, pastrami, pickles

Queso: chicken, ground beef or chorizo, tomatoes

Cotletta Alla Valdostana

Cotletta Alla Valdostana

This is a stuffed veal cutlet with prosciutto and fontina. It is basically an Italian cordon bleu.

  1. Pound out your veal cutlets if necessary.
  2. Place some fontina and prosciutto on one cutlet, then another layer of prosciutto and fontina if possible. Top with another cutlet. Pinch edges to seal
  3. Bread in flour, eggs, and your choice of breadcrumbs
  4. Serve with gnocchi, potatoes, or anything of your choice

Arancini

Arancini

More information about Arancini and possible variations is under recipe as always.

Classic Sicilian Arancini – Steps: Risotto, Meat Sauce, and Breading

Arancini is stuffed risotto, classically with a ragù sauce, then battered and deep or pan fried.

Risotto – make sure is it thick and the liquid is absorbed properly for shaping https://food-heritage-archives.com/2020/08/10/risotto/

Meat Sauce

  • Onion sautéed in oil
  • Ground Meat – your choice
  • Tomato Sauce and Paste
  • Peas
  • White or Red Wine
  1. Sautée onions in oil then brown the meat
  2. Deglaze with wine, then add peas, sauce, and paste to finish cooking meat
  3. You want the sauce to be the same consistency or thicker as the photo below as you will need to stuff the rice with this. If you think it is too thin, run the sauce through a sieve and add more tomato paste
  4. Put on a sheet pan to cool quicker

Breading – dip in flour, eggs, and breadcrumbs of choice.

  1. Put your risotto into one hand, flatten, and then add a heap of sauce. Cup hand to help shape into a ball, adding more risotto if needed to fill gaps. The size of a small lemon is perfect.
  2. Bread the arancini then let set in fridge for a good 1/2 hour at least. They are great to make ahead of time and then fry when you’re ready.

Frying

  • You oil should be in the the range of 350F if deep frying, but pan fry like any other food, rotating it as needed

Serving – It goes great with tomato sauce and some arugula. You can top with crispy bacon and mozzarella or try multiple cheeses to find your favorite.

More About Arancini, and variations

Arancini has been around for at least 1,000 years, so there have been many variations throughout the years, a very classic Italian way is this Sicilian style. Although most arancini you find in recipes or restaurants is strictly cheese-based, it traditionally has meat, and cheese is optional.

Good variations to do will be to actually add cheeses inside, such as half a small marinated mozzarella ball, or fontina.

A good option for the meat is pancetta or pork jowl, or, chicharrones or cracklings.

Risotto

Risotto

There are thousands of ways to prepare and use risotto, but I will go into detail at the under the recipe as always.

Risotto Bianco – the most basic risotto.

  • The proper rice – arborio, carnaroli, or packages that say “risotto rice”
  • Chicken Stock – the ratio is at least 2.5 or 3.5 of liquid to 1 of rice
  • Diced onion
  • Butter and parmesan
  • White Wine or dry vermouth is optional but is used often to deglaze

Steps

  1. Get your stock warm in a pot, and keep it at a gentle simmer
  2. The rest of the instructions will apply to a separate pan. A wide pan is best.
  3. Add onion and sautée in butter until softened
  4. Turn heat to med-high and toast the rice – cook until translucent without browning. If you see any browning of the rice, stop and go to next step, but it is not the worst for a couple brown grains
  5. Deglaze with wine, cook until almost fully evaporated
  6. I keep my heat 3-4/9 now. Add about 2 ladles of the stock for the first go around, then 1 ladle of stock at a time from there on. Do not add more until it is absorbed.
  7. Stir at least once a minute, going into the rice is cooked to al dente, 15-20 minutes. If it is not done after 20 minutes from adding the stock, the rice needs to be toasted more and/or the heat needs to be higher.
  8. **The classic Italian way is Al Dente, but I personally prefer cooked all the way through.
  9. Add butter and freshly grated parmesan.

More About Risotto

As I stated before, risotto possibilities are endless. Once you have this basic risotto down, you can branch out and do a milanese (which is just adding saffron) use beef stock, add mushrooms, top with pesto; really anything.

My favorite additions: sautée bell peppers or celery with the onions, add crushed tomatoes to stock, top with chicken and/or balsamic reduction.

About the rice: The reason risotto recipes call for certain types of rice is because of their starch content. The creaminess of the end product comes from the rice even before the added butter and parm.

A favorite thing of mine is to make the risotto bianco and then make arancini (fried rice balls) with the leftovers. A post for that will be ready by 08/13 with a link in this spot.

Interesting Fact: During the regime of Mussolini, the wheat and semolina imports to Italy were seen as damaging to self-sufficiency, and the solution was rice. It could be produced domestically, and although the campaign for rice was not fully successful, the many recipes for risotto and free rice given to the people made it more well-known.

Now risotto is a popular Italian dish, with the Croatians and others taking a liking to squid ink risotto among other variants.

Ćevapi, or Ćevapčići

Ćevapi, or Ćevapčići

Like most of the time, I put the description at the bottom to be recipe user friendly.

The best combination plate I have made has the pita or lepinja (somun), ajvar, ćevapi, sliced raw onions, roasted or raw tomatoes, and cottage cheese.

Ajvar

  • Red Bell Peppers
  • Eggplant (traditional), zucchini (if you can’t find or stand eggplant)
  • Lemon Juice
  • Garlic, minced or roasted
  • Salt and Olive Oil
  1. 1:1 ratio of each vegetable by weight, though more peppers if anything. Start by roasting the bell peppers and the other vegetable in the oven on 375 until charred and peelable (zucchini gets soft but does not peel easy). It helps to wrap the vegetables in a towel after roasting for easier peel.
  2. Deseed the vegetables and then depending on your preference: chop finely, food process everything, or blend. I like blending.

Ćevapi – as with all recipes there are different variations but here are the main components

  • Ground meat: can use beef, pork, or lamb. Combine 2 or 3 if you choose.
  • Garlic cloves, pre-roasted in olive oil
  • S&P
  • Paprika
  • Spicy Spice (I prefer berber, cayenne, etc.)
  • No egg needed, though if used, go light so there is less liquid
    Roast garlic
    Mix ingredients, done. Just kidding. Let flavors absorb in meat for at least 30 minutes. They taste great on the barbecue and is common to cook there, but I prefer to catch all of the delicious juices for later.
    Cook in pan with hot olive oil on medium heat, and be sure to carefully rotate them until the outer layer is sturdy. I like to throw raw onion in the pan to get more flavor as well. Continue cooking meat until your liking.
    For extra deliciousness, after the meat is out, deglaze the pan with balsamic vinagar and add some butter, then let the pita soak in the juices.

Pita Bread or Lepinja

  • I don’t have a recipe or ideas on how to make them on my own, and I’m certainly no expert in breads, so my favorite one is from the NYT Cooking app. For breads, they have the best ratings and easy to follow, though I used a different website for these pictures below.
  • One tip I have for pita bread is to make the dough stickier than most breads. The pita does not need pockets, but it is how it is traditionally served, though it is tricky to get the consistency right.

The ćevapi or ćevapčići is a Balkan tradition, though it developed from the Ottoman’s kebabs during their occupation. It is the national dish of Bosnia & Herzegovina but it is shared greatly in the region. Serbia and Croatia are famous for the ćevapi as well, along with the other former Yugoslav states.

Culture side note – You will find that there is a common bond between these countries but there are cultural differences. Religion is a big one, and you are welcome to dive deeper into the conflict that occurred in the region, with tensions still high.

Back to the meal, ajvar is the most common side dish to ćevapi, and goes along with the pita, or lepinja (somun) bread. The main difference with those two is the lepinja (also known as somun) is risen 3x and is more region specific than the pita, which is used in far more countries outside the Balkans.

Geography side note – The Balkans defined by Britanica: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Kosovo, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Romania, Serbia, and Slovenia.

  • These countries, though similar in geography, should not be grouped together as one country, just like you would not group Ireland and North Ireland, Sudan and South Sudan, or Israel and Palestine based on their geography alone.

Haluski

Haluski

An Eastern European food typically attributed to Polish origin. It can be a vegetarian dish by not using pork, and is mostly omitted anyways. I added it for more filling. This takes about 10 minutes from starting your prep to finish. Cheap, delicious, and easy.

  • Butter
  • Onion
  • Cabbage
  • Egg noodles
  • (Optional) – pork: bacon, pancetta, kielbasa
  1. Heat a pot of water and a pan with some butter and pork if using.
  2. Chop the onion then put in pan of butter and sauté for a couple minutes
  3. Add egg noodles to water then chop your cabbage
  4. Add your cabbage and some salt and pepper to pan of onions and cook until soft
  5. Add drained egg noodles.
  6. Done

Roast Vegetables

Oil and seasonings are the main thing.

For potatoes I may do the standard mix I use: salt, pepper, onion powder, and garlic powder. Then I may add Italian seasoning.

For broccoli, cauliflower, or broccolini, I just use that 4 spice mix.

For carrots I add some brown sugar and the 4 spice mix.

Whatever the vegetable; toss in olive oil, garlic oil, or your preferred oil, and season generously.

Then put on a pan with parchment paper on 375. Stir once or twice and turn pan around to cook evenly. The time varies greatly depending on the size you cut the vegetables, and the variety.

Broccolini will be done in less than 15 minutes, while carrots may take over 30.

Roasted Garlic – Garlic Oil

Garlic oil is a byproduct of roasting garlic and is commonly used in restaurants to create a more flavorful oil.

I usually buy the peeled garlic for this when I make it at home due to the large amount of garlic I used.

How-to

Fill a bread or similar sized pan halfway with peeled garlic then add olive oil until it covers it by at least 1/2 inch. The garlic that is uncovered will cook more quickly and may brown too much if left alone.

Put the pan in the oven with foil loosely on top at 350 for at least 45 minutes. You are waiting until the garlic is soft and mashable. It will be a long while before the garlic is burnt. I usually check every 10-15 minutes from here on out, though you can lightly roast the garlic until it has not really changed color, or you can wait until it is a golden brown.

Cool the pan once it is done so you can put the strained garlic oil into a container that won’t melt.

Either keep the garlic as is, or purée it and find the many useful ways such as marinating chicken or making garlic bread.

Risotto – about

Risotto is a dish with starchy rice cooked in a broth/stock. The rice used primarily are arborio, carnaroli, and vialone.

The rice is usually cooked by adding the liquid a ladle full at a time with very frequent stirring, though many are now just adding the liquid and letting be.

When starting the risotto, there is usually at least onions sautéed in butter and sometimes celery as well, then the rice is toasted, then deglazed with vermouth or wine.

The broth is then slowly added, waiting until it gets absorbed before adding more.

It is classically cooked al dente, but most restaurants in America will serve it tender.

Restaurants from different cuisines have taken on this delicious rice dish. I have seen it in Albuquerque at a Spanish (Spain) restaurant who put hatch chiles and corn it, and at a German style restaurant in Fredericksburg.

  • Fun fact of the day: Mussolini tried to get Italy to eat more risotto instead of pasta due to the country’s reliance on importing the wheat.

Himmel und Erde

Himmel und Erde

“Heaven and earth”. Mashed potatoes and apples.

  1. Peel an equal amount of apples and potatoes, then large dice the potatoes and large slice the apples.
  2. Boil gently until both are tender in salted water.
  3. Drain, mash together, then add butter, salt, pepper, and nutmeg.

Forelle Müllerin

Forelle Müllerin
  • A classic trout dish, known as trout meunière.
    1. Put salt, pepper, and lemon juice on a piece of trout filet with the skin on. Let sit for a few minutes.
      Dredge in flour and pan fry.
      While frying, melt butter in another pan and brown to drizzle on top of the trout.
      Serve with lemon and any side you want.

    Faust, Part 1

    Faust, Part 1

    Faust is a German book by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, published in 1808. I am still working on my German, so I got an English copy at the library.

    The book revolves around a man selling his soul to the devil in exchange for his youth and true love. It is a very thought out book with references to the Bible and some German mythology, and is including some Shakespeare characters.

    I first heard about Faust from the 1926 movie with the same name, directed by F. W. Mornau, which is one of my top ten movies of all time. The movie revolved around the same plot as the book and was very well done as well (I will detail more and even make a post of it when I rewatch the movie.)

    As I mentioned, the book does have references that you may need to look up to clarify the significance of a character or theme, as I did. The translation I obtained is well worded and I was able to fully understand Goethe’s meaning, though I did buy a German copy on Amazon for $7.

    EBay and Thriftbooks are 2 other great options for used books.

    There is a part 2, though it is a different story, and it was actually writen by Goethe over many years later in Goethe’s life. I have not read this part.

    Overall, if you are looking to get started in foreign literature, especially German, this is a great place to start.

    Apfelkuchen

    Apfelkuchen

    Apfelkuchen is a German apple cake. This particular one was in “Fredericksburg Home Kitchen Cook Book (13th edition, 150th anniversary of Fredericksburg)”, with Mrs. Henry J. Bierschwale submitring this recipe in 1975.

    • 3 green apples
    • 1/2 cup hot water
    • 3/4 cup olive oil
    • 2 eggs, beaten
    • 2 1/2 cups flour
    • 1 1/2 cups sugar
    • 1 tsp baking soda
    • 1 tsp cinnamon
    • (Optional pecans)
    1. Mix dry ingredients in small bowl
    2. In large bowl add hot water to apples, then oil, then eggs, then flour mixture, and pecans if using
    3. Put in greased baking dish on 325F for 1 1/4 hours

    Rödkål

    Rödkål

    A Swedish way of cooking red cabbage. It is very similar to the German Rotkohl, except I found there are less recipes with green apple. I originally found Rödkål in “Swedish Touches”, and then looked for recipes in Swedish.

    1. Sautée shredded cabbage in butter or lard
    2. Add water and salt, then cover. Simmer until halfway done
    3. Add cloves, apple cider vinegar, and sugar. Finish cooking